PROJECT OVERVIEW AND DELIVERABLES

Important Dates:

  • Virtual City Slideshow Due Date: Tuesday, November 14, 2017

  • City Essay Due Date: Thursday, December 14, 2017

  • 2-Dimensional City Map Due Date: The Rhoades School STEM Fair - Tuesday, December 19th 6:00-7:45 pm

  • Project Plan Due Date: Thursday, January 11, 2018

  • 3-Dimensional City Model Due Date: The Rhoades School Future Cities Expo - Tuesday, January 16th 1:00-4:00 pm

  • Regional Competition Date (Grossmont College): Saturday January 20, 2018

  • Finals Date (in Washington, D.C.): Tuesday, February 20, 2018

VIRTUAL CITY

  • Progress Report #1: Due at end of third class using SimCity.

    • 6A: Due at end of period on Monday, November 6th

    • 6B: Due at end of period on Friday, November 3rd


  • Progress Report #2: Due at end of sixth class using SimCity.

    • 6A: Due at end of period on Monday, November 13th

    • 6B: Due at end of period on Friday, November 10th

  • Virtual City Slideshow: Due Tuesday, November 14th

    • Let’s look at an example so we know the expectation!

THE
AGE-FRIENDLY
CITY

"Design for the young and you exclude the old.  Design for the old and you include everyone."  

           ~ Quote from the Future City Age-Friendly City webinar

Please click on the button below to be directed to a list of research resources for an "age-friendly city."

This link to the AARP Livability Index may also be helpful.

DELIVERABLE #1: PROJECT PLAN

Ongoing Deliverable

PROJECT PLAN TEMPLATE

This file can be downloaded and edited in your "Pages" application.

PROJECT PLAN EXAMPLE

Click on the button below to refer to a completed Project Plan example. This example can also be found in your project team folder.

Click on the image below to be directed to the Scratch Studio of Student games from 2016-17. 

2018 Student Games

(click on image below to be directed to Scratch Studio)

Electrical Circuits

LEDs

LED stands for light-emitting diode, which means that much like their diode cousins, they’re polarized. In other words, they only work in one direction. There are a few ways to identify the positive (anode) and negative (cathode) pins/leads/legs on an LED.

1. Find the longer leg, which should indicate the positive, anode pin.

2. If someone’s trimmed the legs, try finding the flat edge on the LED’s outer casing. The pin nearest the flat edge will be the negative, cathode pin.

3. Look inside the lens where the leads extend up. One side is much larger than the other. This is called the anvil and is connected to the negative lead.

LED Circuit Diagram Symbol

Early finishers may play the addicting game of "Electric Box."

Get electricity to reach the target.

Circuit Simulator

Pineapples

(practice with the ruler)

Raspberry

(for early finishers)

Inkscape Tutorials 

(click on image below to be directed to tutorials)

Inkscape Text Tutorials 

(click on images below to be directed to tutorials)

Use "Brush Script" Font

Use "Impact" Font